Friday, October 4, 2013

Christmas Countdown wooden blocks {a tutorial}

The last few wooden block tutorials I've posted used blocks cut from 2x4s or 1x4s.  This one is going to be different.  Although it does use one piece cut from a 2x4, it also uses two square blocks!


Cute, right?  Let's get started!!

Just like the other wooden block tutorials I've shown, these are simple and inexpensive.  This project cost me about $6.   

Here's what you need:
  • Heritage Makers template 112267.  This is actually my own template--I created it!  Just click the "template gallery" link at the upper right, then type 112267 into the search field.  
  • a 7.5" piece of wood cut from a 2x4 (found at home improvement stores)
  • two 3.5"x3.5" blocks of wood (You can sometimes find these at craft stores pre-cut, but they come out cheaper per block if you buy a 4x4 post at a home improvement store.  Some of the ones made for fences are pre-treated and don't take paint very well.  Assuming you use all the blocks you can cut from an 8-foot 4x4 post, each block comes out to be about 50 cents.  If you're only making one set of these, though, then the ones at the craft store might be less money out of pocket.  And, as you might guess if you've read any of my other wooden block tutorials, a 4x4 post actually measures 3.5x3.5".)   
  • a saw (unless you are using pre-cut blocks from a craft store.  If you are using a 4x4 post from a home improvement store, DO YOURSELF A FAVOR and find a nice person who will cut it for you.  The nicest man ever offered to cut my whole 8 feet into 3.5" blocks for me.  It rocked.) 
  • paint (Craft paint or spray paint; I use craft paint.  I'd recommend a cream/off-white/tan/or light brown.  Do whatever you want.)
  • adhesive  (spray adhesive, Xyron, double-sided tape, Mod Podge, or UHU stick)

STEP 1:  create the beautiful part
Unless you want to create your own design from scratch, go in to your Heritage Makers account and place the template 112267 into your account by doing a search for it in the Template Gallery.  Once you find it, click on it.  Then click "personalize."  

While you wait the 7-10 days for it to come in the mail...

UPDATE 2022:  Heritage Makers is currently being updated to a new software platform that doesn't require Adobe Flash to run (which Adobe discontinued at the end of 2020).  For the time being, it's most likely easier for you to order these Heritage Makers items from me than it will be for you to make them in your own Heritage Makers account.  Just contact me with questions (or to order) these great items!

STEP 2:  cut your wooden blocks

Unless you bought the blocks pre-cut or found a nice person at the home improvement store.  In any case, you may still need to cut the 7.5" piece from a 2x4.  

STEP 3:  prepare the wooden blocks
Sand rough edges.  

Paint all sides.  Let dry completely.  (I decided to save a little time and paint this time by not painting the whole blocks.  Most of each side will be covered anyway.)

STEP 4:  cut out the cuteness
After your pages have arrived in the mail from Heritage Makers, cut out the cuteness.


Choose your weapon:  paper cutter or scissors.

STEP 5:  adhere the cuteness to the blocks
The important part here is to follow the directions.  In order to make number combinations like 14 and 27, certain numbers need to go on certain blocks.  Or you will be sad.  Each square block has six sides.  One block should have the numbers 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 on it.  The other block should have the remaining 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9 on it.  

Use spray adhesive, Xyron, double-sided tape, Mod Podge, or UHU to adhere the decor squares to the blocks.  I opted for the Xyron again.



Then stick the pieces on!  (Don't forget to stick the right pieces on the right blocks!)



 HOW CUTE IS THIS?!?
 

I SO love it.  And it's such a great #giftidea too!

UPDATE 2022:  It won't look exactly the same, but an other option for creating your own digital scrapbook pages and making them into something just like this is to use Artisan digital scrapbooking software by Forever.  You can learn about Artisan here: